• Sean McNamara, Doghouse

“Be careful of the last two miles,” Sophie warns us, “they are sheer torture.”

  • Barbara Platts, No holds barbed

After a jam-packed Colorado winter, the chairlifts around the state have, mostly, closed down for the season. This time of the year, referred to fondly by mountain town locals as off-season or shoulder season, occurs in the spring and fall when residents are either impatiently waiting for th…

  • Jim Hollrah, An Idle Mind

When Daniel Boone, the fabled early American explorer, was asked late in life if he had ever been lost he replied, “I can’t say as ever I was lost, but I was bewildered once for three days.” Men do get lost, but like Boone, they hate to admit it. It is well-known that men won’t ask for direc…

  • Barbara Platts, No holds barbed

At the start of this month, Gov. John Hickenlooper joined with three other state leaders to send a letter to newly appointed Attorney General Jeff Sessions, as well as Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin. The message regarded marijuana laws, and the signatures at the bottom of the note were fr…

  • David Brankley, Being There

A book that was popular a few decades ago claimed that men are from Mars, and women are from Venus. It was a metaphorical comparison rather than literal, but the differences the author was highlighting are real enough. The premise of the book is that despite our common humanity, common exper…

  • Paul Reich, guest commentary

In 2015, almost 43,000 Americans, including 1,083 Coloradoans, died by suicide, placing Colorado seventh among states in the U.S. (per 100,000 in population). On average, one person dies by suicide every eight hours in Colorado and suicide is the leading cause of death for ages 10-14 and the…

  • Sean McNamara, Doghouse

From Pleasant View on The Devil’s Highway, drive west on Montezuma County Road CC for nine miles and you arrive at a spectacular hilltop ruin, well publicized and famous, but seldom visited. It rained three days ago but there is only one set of tire tracks in the parking lot. 

  • Suzanne Beresford, Guest commentary

Living in rural Colorado creates a special kind of identify for those of us in the more sparse areas of the Rocky Mountain State. Not only do we have an appreciation for smaller communities and never-ending landscapes, but we also develop a pride built on the notion of self-sufficiency. 

  • Barbara Platts, No holds barbed

After a jam-packed Colorado winter, the chairlifts around the state have, mostly, closed down for the season. This time of the year, referred to fondly by mountain town locals as off-season or shoulder season, occurs in the spring and fall when residents are either impatiently waiting for th…

  • Jim Hollrah, An Idle Mind

When Daniel Boone, the fabled early American explorer, was asked late in life if he had ever been lost he replied, “I can’t say as ever I was lost, but I was bewildered once for three days.” Men do get lost, but like Boone, they hate to admit it. It is well-known that men won’t ask for direc…

  • Barbara Platts, No holds barbed

At the start of this month, Gov. John Hickenlooper joined with three other state leaders to send a letter to newly appointed Attorney General Jeff Sessions, as well as Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin. The message regarded marijuana laws, and the signatures at the bottom of the note were fr…

  • David Brankley, Being There

A book that was popular a few decades ago claimed that men are from Mars, and women are from Venus. It was a metaphorical comparison rather than literal, but the differences the author was highlighting are real enough. The premise of the book is that despite our common humanity, common exper…

  • Paul Reich, guest commentary

In 2015, almost 43,000 Americans, including 1,083 Coloradoans, died by suicide, placing Colorado seventh among states in the U.S. (per 100,000 in population). On average, one person dies by suicide every eight hours in Colorado and suicide is the leading cause of death for ages 10-14 and the…

  • Sean McNamara, Doghouse

From Pleasant View on The Devil’s Highway, drive west on Montezuma County Road CC for nine miles and you arrive at a spectacular hilltop ruin, well publicized and famous, but seldom visited. It rained three days ago but there is only one set of tire tracks in the parking lot. 

  • Suzanne Beresford, Guest commentary

Living in rural Colorado creates a special kind of identify for those of us in the more sparse areas of the Rocky Mountain State. Not only do we have an appreciation for smaller communities and never-ending landscapes, but we also develop a pride built on the notion of self-sufficiency.