DEAR EDITOR:

I just read about Mountain Village’s new deed restriction program modeled after Vail’s YES program. My concerns are that a property owner that participates in this program may not think about the possible negative impact of the future value or sale of their property. In my opinion, some future buyers may not want to purchase a deed-restricted property for a couple of reasons. Some home or condominium purchasers just won’t want to buy a property that has this restriction. For some, privacy is a very important issue to them and just don’t want to have a "stranger" in their house. I didn’t read if a property owner that participates in this deed restriction program has any input on who can live in their house or condominium. Having no input over that might discourage some property owners from participating. While some home or condominium owners may like to participate, what happens if they weren’t advised by the Mountain Village government about the above potential negative impacts in deed restricting their properties. At a minimum, the Mountain Village should provide a written disclosure to any property owner about these potential negative impacts to deed restricting their property and that disclosure should advise a property owner to seek legal and future market value impacts. That disclosure should be signed by the property owners with full disclosure that she or he has been advised about these possible negative impacts.

For years, government has been saying the mantra that development should pay its way by supplying some level of work force impact of that development on top of all of the development fees and taxes that it generates for the local governments. If that is the our future, then government should pay its own way too and provide employee housing for its employees. Whatever the solutions are for providing work force housing for our region, the private and public sectors of our economy must be treated equally in that they both impact the need for work force housing. Government should pay its way, too.

George Harvey

Telluride